Adding Texture with Plants

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Another unique way of adding texture to your interior design, is through the use of plants and flowers. The foliage in these all-white interiors add texture and a splash of colour. By providing additional visual interest, the plants help soften the crisp, clean lines and prevent these spaces from looking sterile.

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The wall colours and furniture in these rooms provide the perfect backdrop for using indoor plants to add extra character and style. With varying heights and shades, they also show how good placement can be to create a very cosy feel especially for those who can’t get enough of them.

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Clearly, a few plants can liven a space but why not make a bold statement with a vertical garden. With the perfect assortment of textures, sizes and shades, they show how plants can easily offer a unique texture of their own and fill a room with exuberant life.

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3 Ways to Use Mosaic in Interior Design

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Dating back to the 3rd millennium BC, mosaic is a technique of decorative art or interior decoration. Most mosaics works are made of small, flat, roughly square, pieces of stone or glass of different colours, known as tesserae; but some, especially floor mosaics, may also be made of small rounded pieces of stone, and called pebble mosaics.

Yet as ancient as this technique may be, mosaics can be used to create modern and luxurious interiors as well. Below we present 3 ways of using mosaic in contemporary interior spaces.

1. Mosaic walls

Due to this technique entailing the use of many small pieces to create patters, it is sometimes recommended to use this decorative style on small areas, creating accent walls:

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Depending on the space, mosaics can also be used to cover large wall surfaces, especially in rooms that do not typically have lots of furniture or accessories, such as hallway or waiting areas:Blog-2-large-mosaic-walls

2. Moroccan mosaics

Use this style if you’re going for a bright, lively look for your space. Do keep in mind that due to the use of rich patterns and contrasts specific to this particular design, you should use less bold accessories in the interior, to create a visually balanced space:Blog-3-moroccan-mosaic

3. Mosaic accessories and surfaces

Not surprisingly, the mosaic look has been adopted in the creation of diverse home surfaces and accessories, such as tables, lamps, candle holders, coasters, etc. And it works great, as these items add liveliness and colour to the interiors. A few of our favourite examples include:

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If you thought mosaics are old fashioned and out dated, we hope this blog post has helped prove the opposite. We think that, used tastefully, mosaic accent walls can add that extra dash of uniqueness to an interior, in a new, contemporary and modern interpretation.

Using Textured Glass in Residential and Commercial Interiors

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Using glass in interior design is a brilliant way of decorating, furnishing or partitioning your space, while still allowing for a lot of light to enter and circulate. In particular, textured glass surfaces allow the light to bounce and create fascinating glares and shimmers, adding a flare of elegance and mystery to your space.

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We’ve come across a few example of using textured glass for partitioning spaces, which works great in commercial, open-plan spaces:

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Textured glass adds visual interest and varying levels of opacity, which makes it a good choice for residential interior designs as well. A few of our chosen examples include:

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When it comes to accessories, the options are endless. The most popular ones that come to mind are the elegant glasses that feature textured design.

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There’s something magical about glass, and using in decorating interior spaces results in a sophisticated, elegant and modern look.

Texture in Fashion Design

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Admittedly, this post’s topic if not what one would normally expect on an interior designer’s blog. However, all this talk about textured interior designs from our previous blogs has whet our appetite, and so in this blog post, we’re looking at the use of texture in fashion design. More specifically, we’ve fallen in love with a few fabric manipulation techniques – or in other words reshaping the surface of the material:

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The fabric then takes on an additional dimension and depth, and creates a very exquisite look on the clothing items. To start with, we’ve selected a few haute couture designs that have won us over:

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We find the designs to be a fascinating mix of simplicity and sophistication. On a more nature-inspired note, we also liked these two airy dress designs that use colour, texture and pleating techniques:

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As extravagant of these garments look, textured fashion design is not only reserved for the catwalk. So here are some of our favourite examples of prêt-à-porter textured fashion:

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We think texture fabric is an excellent alternative to patters, in adding personality and elegance to an outfit, be it for the day to day wear, or that very special occasion that calls for a carefully selected dress.

Design in Focus: Exposed Brick

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As we’ve been talking about textured walls this month, it’s about time we cover one interior design style that all of us have seen at some point: exposed brick walls. Most often you might be able to see these in public spaces, such as halls, restaurants and cafes. Here are a few examples:

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Yet exposed brick walls can sit quite nicely in a home interior as well in most rooms: from kitchens to bedroom, from dining areas to bathrooms:

Blog-2-1-exposed-brickBlog-2-2-exposed-brickIf you’re one to think that exposed brick walls come only in one colour –  you are in for a treat! Either you’re looking to create a high contrast or something that easily ‘blends in’ with the rest of the room, there are plenty of creative options you can chose from. Here are some of our favourite ones:

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While opting for a wallcovering that imitates brick might seem an easy option to recreate this look within a low budget, we are quite reserved about it. In our vision, the strength of exposed brick walls comes from their coarse, unfinished, rugged appearance and trying to imitate this might turn into a tacky interior design. Best to stick to the original, or try something completely different.

Creating Textured Walls

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We’ve already seen that adding tactile or visual texture to wallcoverings can add a striking and luxurious look to your interior. But when it comes to using this technique, a few things are worth mentioning.

One of the most common methods is the use of textured paint, which creates the look and feel of a canvas, which can then be enhanced by using additional materials like sponges, wood, ribbon, lace, sand, leather, birch and many more. Special tools are used to create texture walls, such as putty knives, brushes, towels, sponges, rollers and combs. Perhaps one of the easiest ways to create a simple and impactful texture in your wall paint is to use a dry brush with hard bristle or even a broom:

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Although textured walls do require for extra time and patience, they are very charming and luxurious, guaranteed to get your guests talking. And on the up side you don’t need to make all the walls in your interior textured, as these walls tend to be the high point of attraction in an interior, so you can keep the rest in a complementary, plain design, to make the textured wall the highlight of the room:

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If you ask us, textured walls are an effort well rewarded: they add authenticity and personality to the room, allowing you to express your own creativity.

Visual Texture for Interior Walls

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We hope you’ve enjoyed the previous post on tactile texture for interior walls and today we’d like to offer a few inspiring ideas for using visual texture, in creating outstanding feature walls.

Using visual texture, the wall mimics a 3D appearance by creating a visual effect of spatiality and depth. The first two examples presented below use strong colours that add a dash of dramatism to the space, while the patterns in the wallcovering design create the illusion of a texture:

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The textured faux-painting technique (left) creates a rich wall that mimics the patters of natural stone, and is nicely contrasted by using furniture and accessories in neutral colours. Paint can be used to mimic natural stone, leather, wood and even pitted metal.

In more toned down hues, the following implementations also create a nice visual effect; the right one makes us think of a dreamy sunset on a cloudy summer sky, while the image on the left mirrors the flooring pattern, creating a surreal, interesting effect for the living space:

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And yet another use of visual texture is present in these two interiors that use neutral colours, to mimic the appearance of unfinished room or naked tile walls and ceiling:

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While we like both equally, we have to admit the concrete wall on the left would look best in a non-domestic interior, while the unfinished naked tile walls can work wonders both in the home and other office or public spaces.

Tactile Texture for Interior Walls

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Walls don’t have to be flat or covered in paint to be attractive. So continuing the theme of using texture in interior design, in this blog post we have looked specifically at textured wall coverings. As with all unusual interior choices it’s best to keep the textured wall surface to a limited area, as not to over crowd the space by having all walls covered with the textured pattern.

As we mentioned in a previous post, texture can be either tactile or visual, creating the illusion of tactile texture. Naturally, wallcoverings follows these two styles as well. In this post we’re looking at tactile texture, and we start with a very exquisite example used on interior walls:

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This is a creative use of ceramic tiles by David Pergier. We particularly like this wall as it conveys the power of 3D textures and the nice glossy surface of ceramic tiles. Also notice how the wall texture is broken into sections by the use of smooth vertical stripes. This further emphasizes the intricate areas, by creating a playful contrast and breaking the monotony of the wall.

One other way of using tactile textured walls is by creating feature walls in an interior space – be it at home or in a shared space. Here are two interpretations, both created using clean, plain white materials:

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While adding texture to the walls may be enough to create a highlight in the room without needing to add colour variations (as in the examples we’ve given so far), sometimes colour can help go the extra mile, and create a truly unique mysterious or playful atmosphere:

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These two examples add an extra dramatic effect to the spaces by using dark colours (left) and high contrast, bright colours (right). While both these examples create a powerful look for the interior, they need to be surrounded by contrasting surfaces, to help highlight them. As such, notice the plain green hue used in the example to the right, which naturally draws your eyes to the textured stripe in the middle.

Autumn Colour Trends

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We’re still quite a long way from autumn, but the season of nostalgia has its very special place in our hearts so in this blog post we’ve decided to share our views on autumn colour trends in interior design, with a Moody Monday spin.

Trying to move away slightly from the cliché red-yellow-orange, we think the blue-green-purple palette to a modern interpretation of the fall season. Just think of half-ripe grapes in the vineyard, or the Northern lights, and you get the picture on what colours we envision:

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We think the mix of colours is a perfect match for the season: a mystical and wondrous representation of the autumn. In our view, interior designs incorporating these colours look brilliantly modern, exquisite and luxurious. But if you’re thinking dark colours are not as easy to fit into an interior, you’re not alone. However, if used creatively, we believe these tones can create a mysterious, contemporary and cosy atmosphere in any interior – be it a living room, bedroom or a café. Here are some of our favourite examples:

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What’s more, darker colours can also be used to add spatiality to small spaces – one more reason to love them! We believe these particular hues of blue-green-purple are a perfect match for the shadowy and mysterious autumn season and we highly recommend using them in modern interiors.

Texture Variations in Interior Design

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Texture in interior design is often used to add highlights to specific areas of the space. We also perceive texture in relation to the adjacent surfaces, the viewing distance and lightning of the area. For example, to highlight a rough surface, this is best placed next to a smooth surface. The roughness is emphasized when the surface is viewed up close and grazed with light (lit from the side), which highlights the texture through shadows and light spots. Moreover, changing the angle from which light hits the textured surface, and the view angle, creates a different visual effect. Here is an exemplification:

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Textures in design can be of two different kinds, either tactile or visual. Tactile texture refers to the actual feeling of a surface – smooth, rough, soft, hard, etc., whereas visual texture appeals to our perception, what a texture might feel like. Oftentimes, through the use of visual texture, a surface can create the illusion of a specific tactile texture or an added depth. Here’s one great example, of how lighting is used to create a different visual effect when looking from a short or longer distance:

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In practice, all these textures can be used in interior design to add distinctiveness to the room, and visual textures in particular can create a stunning effect. Some of our favourites (exemplified below) include the use of patterns (left) and tactile textures (right):

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Adding textures to an interior is a sure fire way of creating a visually interesting space, but we also recommend using caution, as too much texture can create a cluttered and over stimulating appearance to the space.