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As the trend towards co-working spaces continues to grow and expand across some of the world’s most vibrant and creative cities, we take a look at some inspirational creative hubs, offices and studios.

These all feature innovative design; converting and reimagining former office blocks, warehouses and factories.

New York – Coworks, Brooklyn.

Leeser Architecture has inserted angular and brightly coloured stairwells into an ageing industrial building in Brooklyn to create a vibrant office for creative professionals and entrepreneurs.

Coworks facility, Brooklyn, transformed by architects Leeser.
Coworks facility, Brooklyn, transformed by architects Leeser. Photo: Leeser Architects via Kontor

To create visual continuity, the firm used brightly coloured angular forms throughout the building, most notably to enclose stairways that connect each floor. Referencing origami, the stairwells feature sharp folds and bright colours – Yves Klein blue on the exterior and teal on the interior.

Coworks - on one floor, the backside of the stairs – a space not often utilised – merges with a large communal table.
Coworks. On one floor, the backside of the stairs – a space not often utilised – merges with a large communal table. Photo: Leeser Architects via Kontor.  Source: Dezeen

 

London – Walthamstow Central Parade, built in the 1960s first served as council offices.

Inspiring Offices, co-working space designed by Gort Scott
Walthamstow Central Parade, a co-working space designed by Architects Gort Scott Photo: Dirk Linder

Architects Gort Scott worked on restoring the unusual façade details, including the wavy concrete canopy, painted yellow, and the decorative tiles, both of which provided design cues for the interior and new signage.

Interior Walthamstow Central Parade, shared work space and bakery, Photo: Dirk Linder
Interior Walthamstow Central Parade, shared work space and bakery.  Photo: Dirk Linder

Mid-century-inspired details and furnishings pay tribute to the building’s heritage, while utilitarian elements suit its more functional new use. (Source: Dezeen)

Edinburgh – The Biscuit Factory, Leith, is an arts & fashion hub housed in the former Crawford’s biscuit factory built in 1947.

The Biscuit Factory, the former factory converted into a 7,500 foot venue/gallery space
The Biscuit Factory, the former factory converted into a 7,500 foot venue/gallery space

Housing a selection of established and up-and-coming designers, photographers, and creative businesses it epitomises the perfect urban re-development and offers up a new prototype for living and working.

The Biscuit Factory, arts hub and home to photographers and designers, offers the perfect backdrop for pop-up events.
The Biscuit Factory, arts hub and home to photographers and designers, offers the perfect backdrop for pop-up events.

Dundee – Fleet Collective is based on the top floor of the grade A listed Chambers East building of the old Royal Exchange.

The old Royal Exchange was designed in the 1850s in the ornate Flemish Neo-Gothic style by the famous architect David Bryce, in order to house the Chamber of Commerce.

Fleet Collective Dundee, a community of artists and designers, is housed in Chambers Building.
Fleet Collective, a community of artists and designers, is housed in the Chambers Building.

Transformed into a light and practical working environment, it now exists as an important creative hub in Dundee, whose model as a collective has been commended and internationally recognised.

Fleet Collective, Dundee, an open plan working space, incorporating practicality with fun and quirky elements.
Fleet Collective, Dundee, an open plan working space, incorporating practicality with fun and quirky elements. Photos: Fleet Collective

These innovative design elements, combined with opportunity for more social interaction, also create a sense of wellbeing with proven health benefits for those working in these and similar spaces.