Creating Textured Walls

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We’ve already seen that adding tactile or visual texture to wallcoverings can add a striking and luxurious look to your interior. But when it comes to using this technique, a few things are worth mentioning.

One of the most common methods is the use of textured paint, which creates the look and feel of a canvas, which can then be enhanced by using additional materials like sponges, wood, ribbon, lace, sand, leather, birch and many more. Special tools are used to create texture walls, such as putty knives, brushes, towels, sponges, rollers and combs. Perhaps one of the easiest ways to create a simple and impactful texture in your wall paint is to use a dry brush with hard bristle or even a broom:

Creating textured walls

Although textured walls do require for extra time and patience, they are very charming and luxurious, guaranteed to get your guests talking. And on the up side you don’t need to make all the walls in your interior textured, as these walls tend to be the high point of attraction in an interior, so you can keep the rest in a complementary, plain design, to make the textured wall the highlight of the room:

Textured walls in interior design

If you ask us, textured walls are an effort well rewarded: they add authenticity and personality to the room, allowing you to express your own creativity.

Meet Alexandra – our new social media and marketing intern

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This week, we’ve had a new intern joining Moody Monday: Alexandra will be working alongside our Head Designer, Eliza Kesuma, to increase the company’s brand awareness and reach, through social media and marketing communication.

We’ve asked Alexandra to take the stage and introduce herself, talking about how she came to join Moody Monday, her previous experience, passions and ambitions for the future. This is her story:

Here I am, on one of my last evenings of a short road trip in Denmark, checking my email, when I excitedly read the following subject line: “Interview Invitation”. Sender: Eliza at Moody Monday. Oh boy!

When I first read about the internship opportunity one week before, it seemed a perfect match for my previous experience, skills and interests, so I applied immediately. After a closer look at Moody Monday’s website, blog and social media, I started to paint a picture in my mind of this highly creative, closely-knit, vibrant and friendly organization – and I wasn’t mistaken.

Meeting Eliza and Sara for the interview was a truly pleasant experience, as I genuinely felt we ‘clicked’ both personally and professionally. I left the venue happy, knowing that regardless which way this will go, we’ve had a productive encounter and a nice exchange of ideas. I was even leaving with a recommendation for a new book to add on my ‘must read’ list!

A few days later, I got the call from Eliza offering me the position, which I gladly accepted. And so here I am now, three days into the job, taking the lead of Moody Monday’s social media and marketing communication. I do have a few years of work experience in the field, so I’m confidently looking forward to use and improve these skills here, and to help drive Moody Monday on its path to reaching and engaging the right audience. I expect this to be a challenging and rewarding job. I can’t wait!

As for my other passions and hobbies, I occasionally participate in long distance running events, in support of various NGOs, and try to keep my personal blog up to date with random thoughts. That aside, I’m a naturally curious person, so I often drift into new projects:  graphic and web design, photography, painting, crafts, etc. While I don’t see myself going into business with this like Eliza has, I do enjoy spending some of my free time on these hobbies. I like being around creative work, so I joined Moody Monday with a strong desire to immerse myself in all things beautiful. So far so good 🙂

Photo: ©Alexandra Haret 2015

On top of the internship, I’m currently finalizing my Master’s thesis remotely, and will be graduating from Aalborg University in Denmark this summer, with my degree in Market and Consumption.

As for the future, I’m looking to advance into marketing and communication, promoting businesses in various fields, so this field will continue to be my main focus for the upcoming years. However, I’ve always been a ‘Jane of all trades’, so I want to continue adding new skills to my ‘portfolio’. In the near future, I’ll be looking to develop my web design experience, which at the moment is at an early hobby stage.

But all things in good time. In the meantime, I’ll be sharpening my creativity and marketing skills on Moody Monday’s social media space, so be sure to keep an eye on these!”

 

 

Alternative Interiors, Part Three

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This week we’re looking at Textured wallpaper as an interior alternative. Using texture(s) in your wallcoverings can be a tricky technique to get right, but when it’s done well textured walls can be mesmerising.

 

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We love designs that play around with surface textures, so for us textured wallpaper is really exciting. It can be quite a bold statement if used in a residential space: bare brick or stone, wooden panels, even more plush surfaces like the one featured below.

 

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Textured wallpaper is particularly useful for adding an extra dimension to a room, or bringing it out of its more traditional context. How would you use textured wallpaper?

 

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Alternative Interiors, Part Two

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In this week’s alternative interiors blog we’re looking at Abstract designs.

 

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Abstract patterns are always compelling, not least for their unusual quality. They’re also a good way of incorporating an artistic edge to an interior space.



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We like these featured designs which make use of various colours, hues, and shapes to create diverse surface textures. The result is very alluring – you can’t help but be taken in by the complexity of each image.

 

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Like Geometrics, Abstract designs lend themselves to many different styles, making them a versatile interior tool. Surface designers often make use of Abstract patterns as they add depth to 2D spaces (as in the above image).

Alternative Interiors

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Part of our ethos here at Moody Monday is to create designs that challenge traditional style concepts. Florals can be lovely, but they have a tendency to look twee and have been recycled again and again by various designers and artists. In this blog series we’ll be looking for alternative prints and patterns that can be incorporated into interior spaces to create a more original, striking, contemporary look.

To get things started, we’re looking at Geometrics.

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Geometric patterns are a great way to add a point of interest to a room in the form of a feature wall. They can also be used with accessories to jazz up block colours.

 

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Geometrics are rather versatile too – they can make a room look contemporary and chic or provide a retro feel, depending on how they’re used. Making use of prints and patterns is also a good way to incorporate more colour into a space.

 

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A word of advice about geometrics: be careful not to overuse these kinds of patterns in one space. Though the arrangement of various shapes and colours can look stunning, overcrowding a space will make it look confused and disordered.

 

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Inspiring Designers, Part Ten

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The finale post in our inspiring designers series looks at a figure whose family history is rooted in the fashion and textile industry – Dries Van Noten.

Browsing the summer 2015 collection is a real treat for the eyes – bright, bold colours, and lots of contrasting prints and patterns. This vivacity is juxtaposed by the materials used to create the garments – the use of silk and light, floaty materials softens the impact of the statement colours and patterns.

Photo: Part of the inspirations exhibition, Paris.
Photo: Part of the inspirations exhibition, Paris. ©Dries Van Noten 2015.

Noten’s ability to combine such busy prints and patterns whilst avoiding the trap of overkill is what we (as print enthusiasts) find most inspiring. Noten’s designs are alive with artistic flair and beauty.

Photo: Part of the inspirations exhibition, Paris.
Photo: Part of the inspirations exhibition, Paris. ©Dries Van Noten 2015.

Boutique Hotels Inspiration, Part Ten

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The final instalment of our hotels inspiration feature takes us to Japan and the Claska Hotel.

Being primarily concerned with design innovation, the hotel divides rooms into thematic categories: ‘Japanese Modern’, ‘Contemporary’, ‘Tatami’, and ‘Weekly Residence’. These various design concepts present guests with contrasting spaces which range from traditional Japanese, wider Asian influences, welcoming comfort, East-West fusion, and even to more conceptual artistic spaces.

Photo: one of the ‘Weekly Residence’ rooms. ©Claska 2015.
Photo: one of the ‘Weekly Residence’ rooms. ©Claska 2015.

We feel most inspired by the imaginative décor which, though contemporary, still maintains the Japanese style and sensibility. The interesting exterior also makes this hotel a visually engaging space which emits a vibe of creativity. They also have a shop to spoil design fans rotten; fantastic focus on detail!

Photo: one of the Tatami rooms available at Claska. ©Claska 2015.
Photo: one of the Tatami rooms available at Claska. ©Claska 2015.

We hope you’ve enjoyed the hotels we’ve shared with you over the past few weeks. Check out our other blog features where you can see which designers we can’t get enough of!

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Inspiring Designers, Part Nine

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We’re delving into the art world today in our inspiring designers blog with visual artist David Shrigley!

Shrigley’s work is always striking for three reasons: it’s funny, honest, and subversive. We find Shrigley inspiring for his ability to produce work that is simple yet always makes a clear statement.

Pictured: Part of 'Blanket of Filth' series. ©David Shrigley 2015.
Pictured: Part of ‘Blanket of Filth’ series. ©David Shrigley 2015.

Shrigley’s work is currently on display in the Scottish National Gallery as part of the ‘GENERATION: 25 Years of Contemporary Art in Scotland’ (on display until 25th January 2015).

Picture: Part of the 'To Make the Meringue You Must Beat the Egg Whites Until They Look Like This;' series. ©David Shrigley 2015.
Picture: Part of the ‘To Make the Meringue You Must Beat the Egg Whites Until They Look Like This;’ series. ©David Shrigley 2015.

 

Boutique Hotels Inspiration, Part Nine

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We’re staying further afield again this week with the Limes Hotel, Brisbane.

First opened in 2008, this hotel actually forms part of a group of hospitality and entertainment establishments made up of bars and restaurants.

Photo: Contrasting textures lend subtle intrigue to this understated guest room.
Photo: Contrasting textures lend subtle intrigue to this understated guest room. ©Damian Griffiths, Limes Hotel 2015.

Though the interiors, designed by Derlot, deliver exceptional contemporary style, what we really admire is building’s façade (pictured below) which presents a large-scale graphic pattern that also doubles as a feature for the windows of the guest rooms. This statement architecture lets you know upon first glance that the building is a design hotel.

Inside, patterns are more subtle with contrasting surfaces and a mixture of different materials. It seems the design subverts expectations by reversing the usual order of things: bolder prints as a pattern for the exterior, and a more architectural approach to the interior.

Photo: the hotel's impressive exterior. ©Damian Griffiths, Limes Hotel 2015.
Photo: the hotel’s impressive exterior. ©Damian Griffiths, Limes Hotel 2015.

Inspiring Designers, Part Eight

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Today we’re feeling inspired by fashion designer Issey Miyake!

Miyake’s concept focuses on innovation – both in terms of design and the production of garments. To this end, Miyake seeks to defy convention and challenge traditional expectations, continuously striving to create clothes that express diversity and uniqueness.

Photo: Part of the Spring/Summer 2015 collection. ©Issey Miyake 2015.
Photo: Part of the Spring/Summer 2015 collection. ©Issey Miyake 2015. 

What we find most inspiring is Miyake’s fashion-forward, futuristic style; it makes us think of fashion origami with the use of structured, almost architectural forms.

 

Photo: Part of the Spring/Summer 2015 collection. ©Issey Miyake 2015.
Photo: Part of the Spring/Summer 2015 collection. ©Issey Miyake 2015.