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Hats Off to Leo Burnett’s New Moscow Office!

Have you seen Leo Burnett’s new office in Moscow? We have – well, virtually a least, and we think it’s a splendid large interior design! But as with most things in life, it’s all a matter of perspective. And with this giant pair of spectacles literally overseeing Leo Burnett’s open-office plan, you can’t help but see the very creative and stunning appearance of the place:

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Created by Nefa Architects, and with with additional credit going to Dmitry Ovcharov, Maria Yasko, Daria Turkina and Maria Boyko, the space brilliantly combines a minimalist two-colour design, with the enormous pair of thick, black-framed glasses:

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And to add yet another twist to the place, there space features a red coil of seating weaves, along other red accessories in the space; we particularly like the scaled-up red desk lamps that are placed around the large office space:

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Looking at these pictures once more, we can’t help but read the underlying message the Leo Burnett is possibly passing on to their creatives: THINK BIG!

Images via Behance.com

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A Small Bite of Industrial Design

This week we’re taking Moody Monday out, and exploring industrial designs in restaurants. We’ve chosen two quite different ones, to get different perspectives on how industrial design can fit in with the eating experience.

The first is the PAT’S steakhouse in Melbourne Australia:

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We particularly liked the uncommon mix of industrial look and cosiness of this space, created by the tangled lighting system on the ceiling build on pipes, and the warm, lively orange hues of the walls. It builds a balanced look for the place, both inviting and enigmatic.

On a more heavily industrial note, we like the Blue Butcher restaurant in central Hong Kong, China:Blog-1

The use of steel, reclaimed wood, leather and raw plaster gives this interior an amazing industrial yet funky feel. According to the restaurant’s own website, Blue Butcher is trying to recreate the atmosphere of the Prohibition era, using exposed light fittings and long steel metal staircases. We think they’ve done a good job, and we particularly like the heavy dark unrefined wood tables. The only question is… will their food be as amazing as the interior design? We hope so!

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Bringing the outside, inside: nature in interior design

With nature coming back to life, we’re continuing to look for inspiration in the lively world around us, and how creative nature elements can be used in interior designs, to add to the uniqueness of the room.

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We were particularly drawn by this idea of bringing nature with into your living room. Essentially, we live surrounded by nature, so why not invite it in our interior spaces as well? This particular example gives the impression of having a tree growing out of your walls, bringing you a cup of tea! Refreshing!

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This creative 2-in-1 chair and coat hanger is both functional and aesthetically pleasing; it saves space by incorporating a hanger into a chair, and it mimics a tree with growing branches. This is a whimsical take on the fact that traditionally, chairs used to be made out of wood from trees. And even though this one in particular is made of alternative materials – moulded plastic or a type of steel or metal frame, it still keeps the connection to nature, by taking the shape of a tree.

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If you’ve ever wondered what it feels like to be a bird, this chair might take you closer to finding out. Taking inspiration from the shape of a birds nest, we imagine this chair to be a very cosy space, and another whimsical incorporation of nature into the interior space.

Do you use elements of nature into your spaces? We’d love to read your ideas!

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Patterns in Interiors

In this new blog post series, we look at creating patterns through the use of colour, in order to create unique and lively interiors. We take our inspiration from spring/ summer colours and explore how these can be mixed and matched to recreate the zing of the season.

We start with a bold, orange themed interior:

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What we particularly like about this interior is the mix of lively, bright colours and the predominance of curvy lines and organic shapes, reflected in the shape of the furniture and in the patterns on the wall coverings and coffee tables.

In a very different composition, we found this very contemporary blend of purple, lime green, black and white:

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The straight lines and sharp angles used in this interior help create the illusion of extra height in an otherwise low ceiling room. The use of lime gives a fresh, spring-like feel to the interior. While the general rule of thumb is to use only two colours (three, at most!) for large areas, such as a feature wall, we think this particular design has successfully pulled it off with all four hues it features. Bold to the bone!

All colours aside, you can create a striking design, using just black and white and a sneaky pink accent:

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This seemingly simplistic design also adds height to the room. While black and white is not a colour mix you would expect to find in nature, the drips on this wall art gives a touch of authenticity, and the pink drip in particular is a nice surprise to break the monotony. All in all, it’s an inspiring way of pulling together the neutral flooring and the all-black chairs and lamp into a stunning and stylish interior design.

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Alternative Interiors, Part Three

This week we’re looking at Textured wallpaper as an interior alternative. Using texture(s) in your wallcoverings can be a tricky technique to get right, but when it’s done well textured walls can be mesmerising.

 

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We love designs that play around with surface textures, so for us textured wallpaper is really exciting. It can be quite a bold statement if used in a residential space: bare brick or stone, wooden panels, even more plush surfaces like the one featured below.

 

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Textured wallpaper is particularly useful for adding an extra dimension to a room, or bringing it out of its more traditional context. How would you use textured wallpaper?

 

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Alternative Interiors, Part Two

In this week’s alternative interiors blog we’re looking at Abstract designs.

 

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Abstract patterns are always compelling, not least for their unusual quality. They’re also a good way of incorporating an artistic edge to an interior space.



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We like these featured designs which make use of various colours, hues, and shapes to create diverse surface textures. The result is very alluring – you can’t help but be taken in by the complexity of each image.

 

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Like Geometrics, Abstract designs lend themselves to many different styles, making them a versatile interior tool. Surface designers often make use of Abstract patterns as they add depth to 2D spaces (as in the above image).

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Alternative Interiors

Part of our ethos here at Moody Monday is to create designs that challenge traditional style concepts. Florals can be lovely, but they have a tendency to look twee and have been recycled again and again by various designers and artists. In this blog series we’ll be looking for alternative prints and patterns that can be incorporated into interior spaces to create a more original, striking, contemporary look.

To get things started, we’re looking at Geometrics.

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Geometric patterns are a great way to add a point of interest to a room in the form of a feature wall. They can also be used with accessories to jazz up block colours.

 

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Geometrics are rather versatile too – they can make a room look contemporary and chic or provide a retro feel, depending on how they’re used. Making use of prints and patterns is also a good way to incorporate more colour into a space.

 

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A word of advice about geometrics: be careful not to overuse these kinds of patterns in one space. Though the arrangement of various shapes and colours can look stunning, overcrowding a space will make it look confused and disordered.

 

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Inspiring Designers, Part Ten

The finale post in our inspiring designers series looks at a figure whose family history is rooted in the fashion and textile industry – Dries Van Noten.

Browsing the summer 2015 collection is a real treat for the eyes – bright, bold colours, and lots of contrasting prints and patterns. This vivacity is juxtaposed by the materials used to create the garments – the use of silk and light, floaty materials softens the impact of the statement colours and patterns.

Photo: Part of the inspirations exhibition, Paris.
Photo: Part of the inspirations exhibition, Paris. ©Dries Van Noten 2015.

Noten’s ability to combine such busy prints and patterns whilst avoiding the trap of overkill is what we (as print enthusiasts) find most inspiring. Noten’s designs are alive with artistic flair and beauty.

Photo: Part of the inspirations exhibition, Paris.
Photo: Part of the inspirations exhibition, Paris. ©Dries Van Noten 2015.
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Boutique Hotels Inspiration, Part Ten

The final instalment of our hotels inspiration feature takes us to Japan and the Claska Hotel.

Being primarily concerned with design innovation, the hotel divides rooms into thematic categories: ‘Japanese Modern’, ‘Contemporary’, ‘Tatami’, and ‘Weekly Residence’. These various design concepts present guests with contrasting spaces which range from traditional Japanese, wider Asian influences, welcoming comfort, East-West fusion, and even to more conceptual artistic spaces.

Photo: one of the ‘Weekly Residence’ rooms. ©Claska 2015.
Photo: one of the ‘Weekly Residence’ rooms. ©Claska 2015.

We feel most inspired by the imaginative décor which, though contemporary, still maintains the Japanese style and sensibility. The interesting exterior also makes this hotel a visually engaging space which emits a vibe of creativity. They also have a shop to spoil design fans rotten; fantastic focus on detail!

Photo: one of the Tatami rooms available at Claska. ©Claska 2015.
Photo: one of the Tatami rooms available at Claska. ©Claska 2015.

We hope you’ve enjoyed the hotels we’ve shared with you over the past few weeks. Check out our other blog features where you can see which designers we can’t get enough of!

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Inspiring Designers, Part Nine

We’re delving into the art world today in our inspiring designers blog with visual artist David Shrigley!

Shrigley’s work is always striking for three reasons: it’s funny, honest, and subversive. We find Shrigley inspiring for his ability to produce work that is simple yet always makes a clear statement.

Pictured: Part of 'Blanket of Filth' series. ©David Shrigley 2015.
Pictured: Part of ‘Blanket of Filth’ series. ©David Shrigley 2015.

Shrigley’s work is currently on display in the Scottish National Gallery as part of the ‘GENERATION: 25 Years of Contemporary Art in Scotland’ (on display until 25th January 2015).

Picture: Part of the 'To Make the Meringue You Must Beat the Egg Whites Until They Look Like This;' series. ©David Shrigley 2015.
Picture: Part of the ‘To Make the Meringue You Must Beat the Egg Whites Until They Look Like This;’ series. ©David Shrigley 2015.